pre-raphaelisme:

Morgan Le Fay by John Roddam Spencer Stanhope, 1880.

pre-raphaelisme:

Morgan Le Fay by John Roddam Spencer Stanhope, 1880.

mathandmascara:

fandomsandfeminism:

returntothestars:

ianthe:

!!

dat practical armor

I love every aspect of this.

practical armor AND a woman AND a WoC AND not being sexualized?
hold me I’m going to faint.

mathandmascara:

fandomsandfeminism:

returntothestars:

ianthe:

!!

dat practical armor

I love every aspect of this.

practical armor AND a woman AND a WoC AND not being sexualized?

hold me I’m going to faint.

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

outofcontextdnd:

"Roll for Gregorian Chant!"

Sorry for the vent…

Today was a tough day, so if anyone has any tips to make me feel better that would be nice. Sorry to seem so desperate lately.

stannisbaratheon:

@WorstMuse is a relic of the human race

fashionsfromhistory:

Ensemble
1900-1940
Croatia
MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Ensemble

1900-1940

Croatia

MET

defilerwyrm:

thegreenwolf:

xtori34:

Looking up Scottish mythological creatures and

Wulver: a werewolf in Shetland, that is said to have had the body of a man with a wolf’s head. It was reported to have left fish on the windowsills of poor families.

That is the nicest Werewolf legend I’ve ever heard of.

Now I wish I could draw because I’d love to draw this.

image

i tried

zombieswhatever:

19.10.2013

zombieswhatever:

19.10.2013

victoriousvocabulary:

FATIDICAL
[adjective]
having power to foretell future events; prophetic; fatiloquent.
Etymology: from Latin fātidicus, from fātum, “fate” + dīcere, “to say”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Cassandra]

victoriousvocabulary:

FATIDICAL

[adjective]

having power to foretell future events; prophetic; fatiloquent.

Etymology: from Latin fātidicus, from fātum, “fate” + dīcere, “to say”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Cassandra]

typingsdrawings:

laughterkey:

derelictjet:

mindofgemini:

goldist:

malformalady:

The Black Dragonfish(Idiacanthus atlanticus) of the Stomiidae family.

I love how this is like a creature from hell but it has like little pink cheeks 

deep sea anime blush stickers


fun fact those pink cheeks glow to attract unsuspecting prey
fashionable and functional with a dash of abject terror

My aesthetic.

"S-sempai noticed me!! I WILL NOW CONSUME HIS FLESH"

typingsdrawings:

laughterkey:

derelictjet:

mindofgemini:

goldist:

malformalady:

The Black Dragonfish(Idiacanthus atlanticus) of the Stomiidae family.

I love how this is like a creature from hell but it has like little pink cheeks 

deep sea anime blush stickers

fun fact those pink cheeks glow to attract unsuspecting prey

fashionable and functional with a dash of abject terror

My aesthetic.

"S-sempai noticed me!! I WILL NOW CONSUME HIS FLESH"

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Paul Delaroche, The Conquerors of the Bastille before the Hotel de Ville, 1839

oxers:

rosalarian:

greenonthursdays:

huffingtonpost:

WHY THIS WOMAN WOULD RATHER READ HARRY POTTER EROTICA THAN WATCH PORN

When spoken word artist Brenna Twohy tells you that she is an unabashed devotee of all things “Potterotica” — erotic fiction based in the magical universe of Harry Potter — your response probably shouldn’t be that her taste is “unrealistic.” 

Watch her full monologue here. 

(Source: National Poetry Slam uploaded by Button Poetry)

I’m happy to be getting to the point where I don’t have to feel weird about enjoying fanfiction, or having written a bunch of it. Partly it’s that the fandom experience has become more broadly shared. Partly it’s that I stopped giving a shit.

And as for why I like the porny sort of fanfiction, see above. She says it better.

I like sex with context. I like sex when it involves fully fleshed out characters. I like the backstories. I like feeling like these people do other things when they aren’t having sex.

Also, I’d just like to point out that it is incredibly empowering that thousands upon thousands of women, girls and non-binary folks have rejected an abusive porn industry designed by men and catering to men and benefiting men and instead created a safe space to explore their sexuality on their own terms. Sex with context, sex with characters they know, sex that is approachable and enjoyable to them, and completely without the help of a very small group of men telling them what to like, how to like it and how to feel about their own sexuality. 

That is healthy. That is positive. That is glorious. Defend erotic fanfiction and defend the people who read it.

humansofcolor:

brownglucose:

I feel like every black body in America needs one of these. I’m not even joking.

I’ll take a months supply

humansofcolor:

brownglucose:

I feel like every black body in America needs one of these. I’m not even joking.

I’ll take a months supply

(Source: 4gifs)

loish:

my latest piece!